Simulation Outside the Silo: Allied Health Education Simulation Day


Simulation Outside the Silo: Allied Health Interprofessional Education Simulation Day to Improve Patient Outcomes


CEC Faculty and Staff
Faculty and staff involved in Sim-IPE Day.
Medical Assisting and EMS
Students from the Medical Assisting and EMS program prepare to transport a patient from the doctor’s office to the emergency room at the Simulation Hospital.
Pharmacy Technology Student
A Pharmacy Technology student prepares medication in the compounding aseptic contaminate isolator unit, while others are verifying and filling orders needed throughout the hospital.
Radiography Students
Radiography students prepare to X-ray a stroke patient after a fall.
Students Code Blue
Nursing and respiratory students work together on a cardiopulmonary arrest “code blue” patient.
Student Spinal Cord Injury
Nursing and Respiratory Therapy students assessing a new admission with a spinal cord injury.



Albemarle, NC - Students who are currently studying at Stanly Community College’s (SCC) Allied Health Signature Campus in Locust participated in an interprofessional education simulation (Sim-IPE) day on Thursday, February 8, 2018. The mission statement of this project was: “Use best practices in simulation technology to teach allied health students to save lives by learning to work together.” The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN 2017, www.aacnnursing.org) defines interprofessional education as:

Interprofessional education occurs when students from two or more professions learn about, from, and with each other to enable effective collaboration and improve health outcomes. Once students understand how to work interprofessionally, they are ready to enter the workplace as a member of the collaborative practice team.

The senior students from Nursing (LPN-RN), Respiratory Therapy, Radiography, EMS, Medical Assisting, and Pharmacy Technology were involved in Sim-IPE day. Five different patient scenarios were conducted simultaneously while students from each discipline worked together to provide care for the patients. In addition to the scenarios, students participated in a pre- and post-test study to measure the effects that the Sim-IPE day had on their understanding of interprofessional collaboration. The same set of events happened three times throughout the day so that all students were able to participate.

One scenario began in the Medical Assisting doctor’s office, where a patient came in with burns. The medical assisting students stabilized the patient, called 911, and transferred care to EMS. The EMS students started treatment, called report, and transported the patient from the doctor’s office to the emergency room in the Simulation Hospital where nursing and respiratory students were waiting to take over care. Meanwhile, four other patients in an ICU setting within the Simulation Hospital were receiving care from the Respiratory Therapy, Nursing, Pharmacy and Radiography students. There were also faculty that participated as doctors, a secretary, and a nursing assistant to make the scenarios more realistic.

Blair Whitley, SCC Associate Director of Nursing, explained, “The Allied Health programs at SCC strive to deliver evidence-based practice in education to ensure graduates are prepared to provide excellent care to patients when they enter the workforce. For this Sim-IPE day, faculty worked very hard to incorporate interprofessional education using our state-of-the-art technology in the Simulation Hospital. The students were able to collaborate with other disciplines all over campus and learn the value of understanding roles, communication, teamwork, and ethics among the healthcare team to improve patient outcomes.”

For more information about the Allied Health Science programs at Stanly Community College, visit the Crutchfield Education Center webpage.